Header

Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions
Greene County High Schools

Chuckey-Doak North Greene South Greene West Greene


All Greene County High Schools are four-year (9, 10, 11, and 12) public secondary schools that operate under the policies of the following organizations:
● Greene County Board of Education
● Rules, Regulations, and Minimum Standards for the Tennessee State Board of Education
● Standards for Secondary Schools of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
It is within this organizational structure that the following statements are made concerning student registration, graduation requirements, student course requirements, and curricula.

SPRING PRE-REGISTRATION INFORMATION
During pre-registration in the spring, students request eight courses. Please keep in mind that a student's course requests are simply requests. Many factors affect the scheduling process and, as a result, the schedule that a student receives during the summer may differ from his/her original requests.

PREPARATION FOR PRE-REGISTRATION APPOINTMENT
Pre-registration appointments are scheduled in the spring for students, interested parents, and a counselor. During this appointment, the student's registration materials and graduation status are reviewed. After these two items are completed, any remaining appointment time is available for questions. A pre-registration checklist appears on the reverse of the Course Request Form. Students and parents should work to complete this checklist prior to their pre-registration appointment. Appointments are brief so it is imperative that students have all material completed prior to attending. Students must submit the Course Request Form at the conclusion of the pre-registration appointment.

SELECTING ALTERNATIVE COURSES REQUESTS
Students experiencing course conflicts who submit appropriate alternate requests will have those alternate courses attempted in their schedule before it is received. Students experiencing course conflicts who fail to submit appropriate alternate requests will receive an incomplete schedule and forced to find a class in August to fill their open period(s). Open seats in popular courses are extremely scarce in August.

Block Definitions
All high schools utilize a modified block schedule. This consists of four 90 minute classes or periods each day for one semester. (90 days is one semester or term). Block classes are arranged as follows:

Term 1 (1st Semester) Term 2 (2nd Semester)
1st Block 1st period class 1st period class
2nd Block 2nd period class 2nd period class
3rd Block 3rd period class 3rd period class
4th Block 4th period class 4th period class


CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Students pursue a focused program of studies preparing them for post-secondary study in either university or technical training. The three paths of study available at Chuckey Doak, University, Technical, or Dual are flexible so a student can change from one path to another during the first two years of high school. All students must meet the curriculum requirements for graduation appearing in the table below. Please note that University Path and Dual Path requirements meet public university entrance requirements in the State of Tennessee.

University Path Dual Path Technical Path
English 4 Credits 4 Credits 4 Credits
Math 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 Credits
Science 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 Credits
Social Studies 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 Credits
Foreign Language 2 Credits 2 Credits
Fine Arts 1 Credit 1 Credit
Wellness 1 Credit 1 Credit 1 Credit
Vocational 4 Credits 4 Credits
Electives 11 Credits 7 Credits 10 Credits
Credits Required for Graduation 28 Credits 28 Credits 28 Credits


Details Regarding Curriculum Requirements
• The Social Studies requirements for all paths must include:
One (1) credit in World Geography and one (1) credit in United States History, or AP US History and one (1) credit in American Government / Economics
• The Math requirements must include and accumulate a minimum of three (3) high school math credits regardless of their level of math mastery when entering high school. All students must meet state standards on the Algebra Gateway exam. Geometry or Algebra II is required for 9th graders entering during the 2005-06 school years or later.
University Path Math Requirements: Completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and either Probability and Statistics or Pre-Calculus
Dual Path Math Requirements: Successful completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and either Probability and Statistics or Pre-Calculus
Technical Path Math Requirements: Successful completion of Technical Math, Technical Algebra and either Geometry or Algebra II.
• The minimum Science requirements are three credits that must include at least one "life" science and one "physical" science.
All students must also meet state standards on the Biology Gateway exam.
• The English requirement includes one credit in each of the following: English I, English II, English III, and English IV. All students must meet state standards on the English II Gateway exam.
• One computer course is strongly recommended for all students.

COLLEGE BOARD EXAMS
Current College Board examinations include the ACT and SAT. These examinations are administered several times per year for juniors and seniors. Questions should be directed to the Counseling Office.

GATEWAY and END-OF-COURSE TESTING
The State of Tennessee administers high quality tests that measure both content knowledge and critical thinking skills and that use a variety of assessment types.
Students take gateway tests in the following areas: Algebra I, English II, and Biology.
Students must successfully complete these gateway tests in order to receive a diploma.
Students take the end-of-course (EOC) tests in the following areas: English 1, Foundations of Math, Physical Science and U.S. History. Other end-of-course tests may be given in Geometry, Algebra II, and Chemistry. The latter group of tests does not affect the graduation status of students; however, test scores are included as 15% of the student's final grade for that particular course. Additionally, a Writing test is given to all juniors.

STUDENTS TRANSFERRING INTO THE GREENE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS
The number of credits required for graduation for students who transfer into county high schools is three (3) less than the maximum scheduling potential for their four-year high school career. Grade Point Averages for transfer students and their transfer courses are calculated in terms of the current grading scale.

STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS (Board Policy)

TO SCHOOLS
Students are expected to attend the school to which they are assigned by virtue of their residence. Students will enroll in the school of appropriate grade nearest their residence and will be provided transportation if the student(s) reside on an accessible public road.1
Parents may elect to enroll their children in any school in the school system provided the parent provides transportation to and from that respective school and provided that such choice does not cause overcrowding in the chosen school. Principals will be given the right to refuse out of zone students if any of the following conditions exist:
(1.) Overcrowding
(2.) Past discipline problems
(3.) Severe absentee problems
Students will not be picked up or let off at any non-residence without the approval of the principal, without written parental authorization on file in the principal's office, and without assurance to the principal that students arrive and depart at the non-residence location in a safe manner.

TO CLASSES
The principal shall be responsible for assigning all students to classes.
Students who enter the system from another school system are to be placed by the principal in the grade and/or level as indicated by records from the former school. If the student's placement is inappropriate in the grade or level assigned, he/she may be reassigned by the principal to another grade level. Parents shall be k

CLASS RANKING (Board Policy)
Students must be enrolled full time at the home base school to be eligible for ranking among the top high school seniors. All grades earned in grades 9, 10, 11 and the first semester of grade 12 will be counted toward the grade point average and the rank in class.
Honor roll students will be determined by standards approved by the Board. Students who meet these standards, and who do not request otherwise, will have their names submitted to the principal for release to the news media.
Each school department or club which presents honors or awards or conducts contests will file with the principal the name of the honor, award or contest; the basis for selection of the award and honor; the method of participation; and the reason for the contest.
To become valedictorian or salutatorian, a student must be an Honors Graduate. The final semester will not be used in determining class standing.
Beginning with the freshman class of 2006, Honors Graduate will be ranked first followed by the rest of the senior class.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS (Board Policy)
To meet the requirements for graduation, a student shall have attained an approved attendance, conduct and subject matter record which covers a planned program of education, and this record shall be kept on file in the high school.
The program of studies shall include areas and content in these areas within State Board of Education Regulations and shall be flexible enough to facilitate progress from one stage of development to another, thus providing for more effective student adjustment. The pattern of courses which shall be required of all students in grades nine (9) through eleven (11) shall be in accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the State Board of Education and the Board of Education.
Before graduation, every student shall achieve specified units of credit or make passing scores on the required gateway tests (Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science).
Special education students who successfully complete their Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and pass the required competency test or the required gateway tests shall be awarded a regular diploma. If the student does not attain a minimum score on the competency or gateway test, he/she shall be awarded a special education diploma upon graduation.
Students who have completed all graduation requirements will be awarded the Regular Diploma; students who complete all graduation requirements but who have not passed the Gateway Test will be awarded a Certificate of Attendance. Students who have completed all graduation requirements shall be awarded such based upon the following number of credits:
Regular Diploma 28 Honors Diploma 30
To become an honors graduate, the student must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.5 throughout the first semester of his/her senior year and complete a higher level math and science course beyond the minimum and complete one of the following: two (2) years Honors English, one (1) AP English or Dual Enrollment English IV.
Changes apply to freshman class of 2006.

STUDENT LOAD
All students in grades nine (9) through eleven (11) shall be enrolled each semester in subjects that will produce a minimum of eight (8) units of credit for graduation per year. A senior must enroll in a minimum of seven (7) units of credit per year. Hardship or gifted cases may be appealed by the student to the director of schools with further appeal to the Board.

GRADING POLICY (Board Policy)
The director of schools shall develop an administrative procedure to establish a system of grading and assessment for evaluating and recording student progress and to measure student performance in conjunction with Board-adopted content standards for grades K-8. The grading/assessment system shall follow all applicable statutes and rules and regulations of the State Board of Education. The grading/assessment system shall be uniform district-wide at comparable grade levels except that the director of schools shall have the authority to establish and operate ungraded and/or unstructured classes in grades K-3.
The director of schools shall submit a copy of the grading, reporting and assessment systems to the Board before the system is implemented. These guidelines shall be communicated annually to students and parents/guardians.
Conduct grades are based on behavior and shall not be deducted from scholastic grades.
All end of course Gateway exams will count 15% of the student's final grade.

GRADES NINE - TWELVE GRADING SCALE AND LOTTERY SCHOLARSHIPS (Board Policy)
Schools teaching grades nine through twelve shall use the uniform grading system established by the State Board of Education. Using the uniform grading system, students' grades shall be reported for the purposes of application for post secondary financial assistance administered by the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation.
Each school counselor shall provide incoming freshman with information on college core courses required for lottery scholarships as well as necessary criteria (grade point average, ACT, and SAT score, etc.) that must be met in order to receive a scholarship.
Seniors may apply for the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is available at the guidance office or on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The priority date for FAFSA completion is May 1.
Elementary school counselors should explain the HOPE Scholarship and its requirements to their students and impress upon them the benefits of making good grades.

LOTTERY SCHOLARSHIP DAY
Each school year, prior to scheduling courses for the following school year, schools teaching students in grades 8-11 shall conduct a lottery scholarship day for students and their parents.

GRADUATION RECOGNITION
Students are recognized for graduation honors based upon achieving the following grade point average (in any graduation track) over a four-year period: GPA of 3.5 and above constitutes an Honor Graduate.

GRADUATION ACTIVITIES (Board Policy)
Students who have met all graduation requirements on the day of graduation and students who are within two (2) or fewer credits of meeting all requirements1 and can complete the requirements during the summer may participate in graduation activities. If extenuating circumstances exist at any school, the matter shall be presented to the Board prior to graduation activities. Students are expected to participate in all graduation activities. Graduation apparel shall be determined by the administration of each school and shall be the personal expense of each student, except for students who are eligible to receive free or reduced price lunches.2 In such cases, the school shall assume responsibility for payment of fees, provided, however, that the school shall not be responsible for the expenses of graduation apparel if it consists only of the student's personal clothing.
Graduation ceremonies shall be physically accessible to all students, their parents and/or guardians, and other interested citizens. Students who do not wish to participate in graduation activities shall make this known to the school principal at least five (5) days prior to the day of graduation. Non-participating students will receive their diplomas, or certificates, from the principal's office on the day following graduation ceremonies. There shall be no sponsorship of a baccalaureate service or other activity which is religious in nature by the Board or its employees, and no school funds, including paid staff time, will be used for such activities. A dedication ceremony shall recognize the religious pluralism of the community and shall be appropriate to those who use the facility. An open invitation shall be extended to all citizens to participate in the ceremony. Traditions, i.e. invocation and benediction, inherent in commencement ceremonies, shall be honored in the spirit of accommodation and good taste.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES
Advance Placement (AP) Level Courses are offered at each high school. AP classes may vary from school to school based on teacher availability. AP Calculus, AP United States History, AP American Government, and AP English IV are some classes that may be offered.
Advanced/Honors Level Courses may also be offered at each high school. Biology Honors, Anatomy and Physiology, Honors English I, Honors English II, Honors English III, Honors English IV are classes that may be available.
NOTE: Additional courses may be available at a later date.

GRADING SYSTEM (Board Policy)
Subject-area grades shall be expressed numerically on report cards. The numerical values correspond to letter grades as follows:
A..........................................93-100
B............................................85-92
C............................................75-84
D............................................70-74
F........................................Below 70
Plus and minus evaluations are not to be added to letter grades.
Grades given at the end of each six (6) weeks period will be determined from daily work, homework, written assignments, tests, in-class participation, projects, and other meaningful assignments. The teacher shall, when requested, be able to fully explain and justify the grade(s) to the student(s), parent(s)/guardian(s), and administrative/supervisory personnel. The teacher will weigh the value of grades given for various assignments and tests within the applicable period in computing the grade. The procedure will enable the teacher to allow for individual student differences in the grading process. All assignments and tests required of a student must be considered in the computation of his or her grade.
Report cards shall include grades for each six weeks and an end of the year average. Attendance records will not be used in determining the awarding of grades or the passing of a course or promotion or retention.
High School
Honor Courses - Beginning in 2005-2006 teachers will add three (3) points to the final average. Advanced Placement Courses - Beginning in 2005-2006 teachers will add five (5) points to the final average.
Six weeks exams will be required in all subjects.
Semester and final course grades are not to be changed once recorded on a report card unless a student has successfully completed credit recovery.
Semester (final) tests will be given at each high school in each subject area. The tests will be weighed as ten (10) percent of the semester grade. Each semester average will be determined by six weeks averages counting thirty (30) percent and the final exam as ten
(10) percent, except for courses that requires End-of-Course/Gateway Exam. In these courses the semester test will be weighed as ten (10) percent of the semester grade, each six weeks average will count twenty-five (25) percent and the End-of-Course/Gateway will count fifteen (15) percent of the final grade.
All students missing a class no more than two periods in a semester may choose to be excused from the semester exam and receive a score equal to the average of the three six weeks grading periods.
Students who fail a Gateway Test will be provided at least one intervention during the regular school day by instructors certified in the appropriate Gateway area. Score conversions for Gateway and End-of-Course tests are based on guidelines developed by the Tennessee Department of Education. The conversion table will vary from test to test. New conversion tables will be distributed to the students prior to testing dates.
Entering freshmen for the 2001-2002 school year that are unable to take the Gateway assessments must take the test at the next administration. Students who miss the test will receive an incomplete until fulfilling this requirement on the next test date. These students must take the Gateway Test at the next administration. The student shall be responsible for making up work missed during excused absences.
The work of a student whose grades is satisfactory but are withheld because of failure to complete required work shall be reported as incomplete (I). If the incomplete is not removed within one semester, it will then become an "F." Students must pass the Algebra I, Biology, and English II Gateway Exam in order to meet the State requirement for a regular diploma.

PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)
The best method to show how to calculate a GPA is by following is a sample transcript. The process used to calculate the GPA is as follows:
Step 1:
Count the number of credits for each passing mark:
A's= 6 credits
B's= 4 credits
C's= 1 credits
D's= 0 credits
Step 2:
Multiply credits by quality points for each mark based on A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0:
A's= 4 x 6 = 24
B's= 3 x 4 = 12
C's= 2 x 1 = 2
D's= 1 x 0 = 0
Step 3:
Sum the quality points to get the quality point total:
24 + 12 + 2 + 0 = 38
Step 4:
Count the number of credits attempted. Be sure to include 1 credit for each failed course.
In this example (by semester):
4 + 4 + 3 = 11 total credits attempted
Step 5:
Divide the quality point total by credits attempted to calculate the GPA:
GPA = 38 / 11 = 3.45

SCHEDULE CHANGE GUIDELINES
Students wishing to request course changes must contact the Counseling Office for an appointment. These changes must be completed no later than one week prior to the beginning of classes. All requests made by that time are honored providing space is available and graduation requirements are not jeopardized. Students failing to make a course change request by the stated deadline may apply for a counseling appointment once school has started. Upon the completion of new student enrollment, counselors schedule conferences with those students who have requested consideration for a course change providing their request meets one of the following guidelines:
• A class on the schedule was taken and passed in summer school
• A class was failed in the second term of the previous year or in summer school that is a prerequisite for a course appearing on the schedule.
• No English or math course appears on the schedule
• A senior who is not registered for a required course for graduation
• Fewer than eight classes appear on the schedule
• Courses are not sequenced in prerequisite order on the schedule
• Student wishes to try a more challenging course
• Changing diploma track (University/Dual/Technical)
The following are NOT acceptable reasons for requesting a course change:
• Teacher preference
• Fear of a low grade
• Course not required for graduation
• Have not completed summer reading requirement
• New employment (unless change involves enrolling in co-op program)

REPEATING A COURSE/IMPROVING GRADE
Students who wish to improve their grade in a course taken may repeat that course during the regular school year. The term "repeat" indicates that the student is taking a course again for which he/she has previously earned either a passing or failing grade. Only the higher of the two grades is reflected on the transcript and no additional credit is awarded. This is the ONLY scenario that provides students with the ability to replace a poor grade on their transcript. Your counselor must be aware of your intentions prior to enrolling in a course for which you already have credit. It is not the intention of this policy to allow students to repeat a course taken previously solely for the purpose of improving their GPA. Generally, a student is not permitted to repeat a course if they have already taken and passed the next course in the sequence.
Sample situations:
If a student earns a grade of D in their math class as a freshman and repeats that same course as a sophomore earning a grade of B, then the grade of D is completely removed from the transcript leaving only the better grade of B.
If a student repeats a course in summer school that he/she has previously failed, the grade earned in summer school is included on the student's transcript, but DOES NOT replace the failing grade. (This situation does not meet "regular school year" portion of policy)
If a student repeats a course in summer school for which he/she has already earned credit, then the summer school course is recorded as an audit (AU) with no additional credit recorded on the student's transcript. (This situation does not meet "regular school year" portion of policy)
If a student earns a failing grade at another school and repeats the course, the new grade is recorded, but the failing grade is NOT replaced. (This situation does not meet the requirement that both the poor grade and improved grade be earned.)
If a student earns a poor, but passing, grade at another school and repeats the course, the course taken is recorded as an audit (AU) with no additional credit recorded on the student's transcript. (This situation also does not meet the requirement that both the poor grade and improved grade be earned. Additionally students may earn only one high school credit in a specific course)

CORRESPONDENCE CREDIT
Students may apply a credit of correspondence work toward graduation with prior approval of the principal and counselor. Students earning correspondence credit must also complete any state mandated testing in order for that course to apply toward graduation.

CHOICES PROGRAM
The CHOICES program is designed to offer to students who are significantly behind in credits options that will allow them to successfully complete high school. Students will complete coursework individually, primarily through computer assisted instruction or, to a limited extent, textbook work.
The basics approach in the CHOICES program is that students will be given all possible help and encouragement to complete the work required for their credits/credential. In return, they are expected to be on time and to work and behave appropriately. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the program. CHOICES students are still enrolled in their home high school (whether they attend classes on campus or not) and are subject to all Greene County School's rules and procedures.

DIPLOMA OPTION
Students must have reached the end of their 3rd year or 17th birthday, and have attended Greene County Schools for a minimum of 1 term. They must have a minimum of 14 credits (22 needed to graduate), and have passed all 3 gateway exams. Students will attend either morning (8:30 to 11:00 AM) or afternoon (12:00 to 2:30 PM) classes. They will be required to hold a job (20 hours a week or more). Failure to comply with this last requirement will result in dismissal from the program.
Computer assisted instruction will be used as much as possible, supplemented by texts and other materials. Students will keep a portfolio documenting their computer work and including any other activities/assessments given to them by the CHOICES staff. Grading will be based on computer-assisted lesson tests and instructor-generated assessments. Attendance and grades will be reported to the home school. Any electives these students take will be determined by the CHOICES instructor.

GED OPTION
Students must be 17 years of age and unable to graduate within a reasonable period of time through any other Greene County Schools program (in other words, they must be so far behind in credits or gateways exams that they do not qualify for the Diploma Option). Students must make a minimum of 400 on the GED Official Practice Test to qualify. They will work individually in computer and text materials until they have raised their practice test score to 500, whereupon the will be sent to take the GED. These students will attend either a morning or afternoon session and must either hold a job (20 hrs/week) or be enrolled in the CFT. Attendance will be reported to the home school.

CREDIT OPTION
These students will attend a morning or afternoon session for the entire semester, during which they can earn up to 2 credits. The rest of the day they will be in other classes determined by their home school. The courses these students take will be determined on a case- by- case basis (many required classes are available, but it is not possible to offer all high school classes through this program.) Computer assisted instruction will be used as much as possible, supplemented by texts and other materials. Students will keep a portfolio documenting their computer work and including any other activities/assessments given to them by the CHOICES staff. Grading will be based on computer-assisted lesson tests and instructor-generated assessments. Attendance and grades will be reported to the home school.

FAST TRACK TO CAREER
A second semester senior, on track to graduate may participate in the Fast Track to Career Program only on approval from the Director of Career and Technical Education that will allow student to make application and enroll in up to three (3) college level courses at Northeast State Technical Community College in a joint enrollment format. The student will enroll in courses consistent with a career plan identified by the student's career cluster focus (concentrator area) of Career and Technical Education coursework completed at the high school as an educational co-operative educational (non-paid) learning experience. The student will complete regular Northeast State Technical Community College courses on their campus for which they are granted joint credit at both the high school and the college. The tuition, fees, books, and transportation costs will be covered through Lottery Scholarship, Educate and Grow, and a Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development grant. Anyone interested in starting a college education early is encouraged to contact the guidance counselor in the Career Counseling Center of the Career and Technical Education Department on or before November of their senior year for an application packet.

WORK BASED LEARNING
Work-Based Learning includes job shadowing, internships, mentoring, registered apprenticeships, and cooperative education. Information regarding Work- Based Learning is available in the Counseling Office

ADVANCED STUDIES PROGRAM AT NORTHEAST STATE
Get ahead of the game - Earn transferable college credit to Northeast State while taking classes in high school. This advanced studies program gives you a jump start from high school to college. Get a Northeast State ID card, full library privileges, and access to all college activities. If this sounds good to you, see these high school counselors. The availability of this program is contingent on funding.

ARTICULATION AGREEMENT
An agreement between Chuckey-Doak and Northeast State, as well as other community/technical colleges provides the opportunity for some students to earn college credit for technical courses while still in high school. Students should ask their technical teachers about which courses are involved in this agreement.

TECH PREP - ACADEMIC/TECHNICAL PROGRAM
Tech Prep is a sequence of study beginning in high school and continuing through at least two years of post-secondary education. The program prepares students for high skill technical employment that allows direct entry into the workplace after high school and advanced study that leads to a college degree. Tech Prep is a combination of academic and technical courses providing knowledge and skills needed for success in modern business and industry, which requires a high level of academic and technical preparation and readiness for advanced study beyond high school. Tech Prep is a method for students to earn free college credit through articulation with Northeast State Community College (see Articulation Agreement section). For more information, contact John Brooks, Career and Technical Counselor, at 378- 8563.

SUMMER SCHOOL
Summer school is currently offered on a needs request basis each summer. Required courses are offered during the summer school program to help students get back on track for graduation requirements. Students are given an opportunity to register for summer school during the last few weeks of the school year. Dates and offerings vary from year to year based on various factors.

HOMEBOUND SERVICES
Homebound services are designed to provide instructional and/or supportive services for any student who:
1.)Has a physical or mental disability, which in the opinion of professional personnel licensed by the Board of Healing Arts, causes him/her to be absent from school for more than two consecutive weeks.
2.) On a temporary basis has been certified by an appropriate specialist as having a disability and verified by the IEP team as the appropriate interim service.

DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES & COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
The remainder of this booklet is devoted to describing the projected course offerings for the upcoming school year. Please keep in mind that information regarding each course, including the projected format of each course (Block) and any projected times are a best estimation based on previous course enrollment, projected course enrollment, and available teaching personnel at the time this booklet was printed. Course availability, course format, and projected times are subject to change at any time. Any lack of adequate student interest in any course results in that course being cancelled. Limited resources (lab space, computer hardware, etc) also affect the final course offerings.

Understanding the Course Descriptions
The course descriptions have been written to provide students and parents with as much registration information as possible. This amount of information may be somewhat confusing to those going through this process for the first time. For clarification, please read this page for an explanation of the fields contained within each course description.

Fields in the course description include Grade Level: Grade level requirement for the course. If a student does not meet this requirement they are not permitted to request this course unless special permission is granted.
Elective course: This field is provided to supply students and parents with information to assist them in selecting elective courses.
Credit: The amount of credit earned toward graduation upon successful completion of the course.
Prerequisite: Students must meet these academic requirements in order to request the course.
Block Course Number: The Block Course Number must be included on the Course Request Form if the student wishes to request the course as a block. The Projected Times may be specific (ex. 1st term or 2nd term) or may be general (ex. 1st term only

 

 

CHUCKEY-DOAK HIGH SCHOOL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

The English department curriculum stresses sequential writing, reading, and analysis of
Literature and vocabulary study. Students enroll in one of the following courses based on teacher recommendation and GPA: English, Honors English, or Advanced Placement.
Honors level courses are for students who desire a more extensive preparation in reading, writing, and discussing literature. Advanced Placement is an intensive college-level class for highly-motivated students who wish to attempt college credit for English. Four credits for English are required for graduation: One credit English I, English II, English III and one credit in English IV or AP Literature and Writing.

Tests required in the English Department:
1.) End-of-course Test (9th grade)
2.) Gateway Test (10th grade) - required passing for graduation

Honors English and AP English are designed to be college preparatory classes and mandate certain behaviors for students. Honors English students will write in a variety of modes (according to grade level), including expository, persuasive, formal research, descriptive, and imaginative writing. Students will respond to literature in subjective, analytical, and evaluative ways. Honors English students should be aware that honors courses function above the regular and college bound classes; honors students should plan to remain in these classes and enroll in AP Literature class as a senior.
Summer reading is required for all Honors and AP students. Reading lists will be added to regular English classes soon. Students must be tested on this material prior to the beginning of the school year. Teachers will be available during summer at scheduled times only; emergency testing will be scheduled only for a death in an immediate member of the family (mother, father, sister(s), brother(s). See the appropriate teacher for summer schedule or check online for the appropriate times for you to test. Accommodations will be made for students transferring to CDHS who do not register until August. Reading assignments, including novels, poetry, short stories, and others, come from state-mandated texts and AP/ College level reading lists. Be aware that some language/situations may be mature in nature and this should be accepted before class begins. The College Board has approved all of the novels on our lists as appropriate for Honors/AP students.

Students in Honors classes will:
1. maintain a "B" average;
2. be eager to learn and exchange ideas (class discussion and participation is very important);
3. accept real challenges in reading, writing, and other assignments;
4. respect others' rights to learn and explore new ideas;
5. be willing to challenge himself/herself to work beyond minimum standards for classes;
6. accept all assignments as mandatory and will complete thoroughly all assignments;
7. maintain acceptable, mature behavior


English I
Grade Level: 9 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 30010 Prerequisite: None
English I is an introduction to world literature where students will have a basic understanding and recognition of fundamental grammar and writing skills and word roots; extend reading vocabulary; and utilize comprehension strategies in reading various reading selections. Students must use several of the preceding techniques to master the end-of-course English I exam, which is worth 15% of their final grade.

English I Honors
Grade Level: 9 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 30011 Prerequisite: Based on projected scores
English I Honors is an introduction to world literature where students will have mastered fundamental grammar and writing skills and word roots, understand vocabulary using context clues, study narrative and expository writing, and participate in independent reading. Students will also trace major themes in literature. Students must use several techniques to master the end-of-course English I exam, which is worth 15% of their final grade.

English II
Grade 10 Required Course: Yes Credit 1
Block Course Number: 30020 Prerequisite: 1 credit in English I
English II is a continued study of world and diversified literature which continues the essential skills to enable the students to pass the Gateway test. In English II, students will have an in-depth study of narrative and expository writing. English II students will recognize and define words using context clues and word etymologies; analyze the various elements of fiction; evaluate resources and credibility of sources; master parts of the sentence and sentence structure; and begin a basic understanding of the persuasive essay.
All English II students must meet the state standard on the English II Gateway in order to receive a diploma.

English II Honors
Grade 10 Required Course: No Credit 1
Block Course Number: 30021 Prerequisite: I credit in English I Honors completed with a minimum of a "B" average
English II Honors is a continued study of world and diversified literature which continues the essential skills necessary to enable the students to master advanced achievement on the Gateway test. In English II, students will have an in-depth study of narrative and expository writing and will focus on the analysis of short stories, drama and other genres. Students will recognize and define Pre-ACT and SAT vocabulary words by using context clues and word etymologies; analyze the various elements of fiction; evaluate resources and credibility of sources; master sentence structure and paragraph fluency; and begin a basic understanding of the persuasive essay. Honors students are challenged with summer reading, cold sample writing, as well as challenging novels and stories that require extensive reading and demanding standards. All English II students must meet the state standard on the English II Gateway in order to receive a diploma.

English III
Grade 11 Required Course: Yes Credit 1
Block Course Number: 30030 Prerequisite: 1 credit in both English I and English II
English III is an American literature survey, stressing elements of style, research and vocabulary.
English III students will write persuasive essays and an expository research paper; study vocabularies related to reading; and read and analyze novels, short stories, and plays. The TCAPS Writing Assessment is required for English III students.

English III Honors
Grade 11 Required Courses: No Credit 1
Block Course Number: 30031 Prerequisite: 1 credit in Honors and English II Honors with a minimum of a "B" average
English III is an American literature survey, stressing elements of style, research and vocabulary. English III students will write persuasive essays and an expository research paper; study vocabulary related to reading; and read and analyzes novels, short stories, and plays. Students will participate in expanding reading opportunities and independent reading. The TCAPS Writing Assessment is required for English III students.

English IV
Grade: 12 Required Course: Yes Credit 1
Block Course Number: 30040 Prerequisite: 1 credit in English I, English II, and English III
English IV is a British Literature Survey in which students read many of the masterpieces of British literature, becoming acquainted with the political, economic, and cultural forces that influenced the writings as well as the developments in literature. The class format includes occasional lectures, frequent class discussions of work assigned, and the preparation of numerous critical essays. Literature selections include such authors as the anonymous Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and the Romantic poets. Papers and projects are both analytical and creative. All students practice research skills, writing both literary and persuasive research papers utilizing MLA and APA documentation. Students will also read and analyze various British and world novels through class and independent reading. Students will write analytical and persuasive essays; exploring universal themes and human experiences in literature; study vocabulary related to reading; and analyze elements of literature and poetry. Students need to understand that extensive reading and writing is required. A persuasive research paper in MLA style is required of all seniors.

AP Literature and Composition
Grade Level: 12 Required Course: No Credit: 1 with possible college credit (AP Testing)
Block Course Number: 30140 Prerequisite: 1 credit in English I Honors, English II Honors, and English III Honors
Students must be prepared and motivated to learn and work at a much advanced level. This course prepares senior honors students for the College Board's AP Literature and Composition Examination. This course integrates composition, world literature, history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and rhetoric. Students will utilize skills in critical and creative thinking, independent inquiry, and affective processes to write essays of analysis and evaluation; present panel discussions and oral reports, participate in group discussion; work independently at problem solving and research; read, discuss, and analyze selected examples of Greek, medieval, Renaissance and nineteenth and twentieth century "classics" while also exploring the social, intellectual and philosophical forces which shaped each author's sensibility. Works studied are by authors such as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Voltaire, Austen, Dostoevsky, Bronte, Wilde, Williams, Joyce, Morrison, Faulkner, Kafka and Rand.
Students sharpen their awareness of language and the writer's craft and increase their sensitivity to literature, which enables them to understand better both themselves and the world in which they live. Analytic and persuasive papers focus students on the study and practice of expressing their ideas in honest, effective language that demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between style, tone, and audience. A persuasive research paper in MLA style is also required of all seniors.

ELECTIVES

Service Learning
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 93950 Prerequisite: GPA3.5 or higher
Service Learning is a class designed to provide students with a comprehensive approach focusing on ethical, social, and intellectual skill development. Students apply knowledge, skills, critical thinking, and wise judgment to address community needs. Through various service projects, students gain an understanding of human psychology, life skills, community needs and resources, civic responsibility, career options, and human diversity through hands-on, real world activities. The values of trustworthiness and responsibility, commitment to a task as well as to the others involved in it, collaboration and team-building, respect for quality of work done, and punctuality are all further developed through the service learning curriculum.

ACT Preparation Class
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 93500 Prerequisite: juniors with at least a "B" average in English.
All students enrolled in the class are required to take the ACT test at least once during the period that they are enrolled in the class. The ACT test is designed to measure important knowledge and skills that students have developed over a period of many years. All four areas of the ACT tests-English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science-are curriculum-based. The four tests assess the students' skill in applying the content knowledge and reasoning skills acquired in their course work to materials like those they will encounter in postsecondary education.
Extensive independent reading is also required in this course. Students will practice thinking skills, problem solving, drawing conclusions, making inferences, and thinking analytically. They will take practice tests in preparation for the exam; and read various novels, essays, etc. in preparation for reading selections on exam.

ACT students will review:
Usage and Mechanics
Punctuation
Grammar and Usage
Sentence Structure
Rhetorical Skills
Writing Strategy
Organization
Style
Mathematics
Pre-Algebra
Elementary Algebra
Intermediate Algebra
Coordinate Geometry
Plane Geometry
Trigonometry
Reading
Prose Fiction: novels, short stories
Humanities: art, dance, architecture, theater, philosophy
Social Sciences: sociology, psychology, economics, political science, history, anthropology
Natural Sciences: biology, chemistry, physics, space science, earth science. Science Reasoning
Data Representation: graphs, tables, other schematics
Research Summaries: several related experiments
Conflicting Viewpoints: alternate interpretations

 


Keyboarding/Career Connections
Grade Level: 9 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 37100 Prerequisite: None
This course prepares the student for other classes where computers are used as well as college and the work place. Students learn proper keyboarding techniques. Students obtain a basic knowledge of several software packages including a word processor, presentation software, and the internet. Students also study the terminology, functions, and uses of computers in our world. Career Connections is a core course for career clusters. The course provides students with tools for achieving success in their academic, work, and personal lives. Course content emphasizes the basic skills and knowledge needed for employment success, as identified by industry and supported by relevant national standards. All course content is presented in a real-world context, providing concrete opportunities for developing personal and career goals, effective communication skills, teamwork abilities, and successful work attitudes. This class is strongly recommended for all students. Note: This course counts as one of the four required technical credits in any of the six career clusters for students pursuing either a technical or dual diploma.

Desktop Publishing (Newspaper)
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 37410 Prerequisite: Formal application and an acceptance letter from the newspaper teacher.
Any student wishing to enroll must first receive approval from the faculty advisor. Students enrolled in this course focus on various aspects of journalistic work from writing to publication. Examples of writing include news, features, sports, entertainment, editorials, and columns. In addition, students participate in interviews, business management, advertising sales, photography work, computer graphics design, and newspaper layout. Students also participate in the publication of the school newspaper, The Charger.

Desktop Publishing (Annual)-Office Assistant
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: Approval by Accolade advisor. A request for this course is not valid without a signed note from the Yearbook teacher.
Annual desktop publishing is a course in which students plan and produce the yearbook. Students learn layout design, computer skills, editorial management skills, and journalistic writing. An emphasis is placed on the use of graphic design software. Knowledge of photography and scrap booking is beneficial.

Library Media Assistant
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 30970 Prerequisite: A request for this course is not valid without signed permission from the Library Media specialist. English I and II, and Algebra II and Geometry
LMA is an elective class during which students are required to learn to use the copy machine and the workings of the library. Students will be assigned a section(s) of the library to reshelve, dust, repair books, etc. Also, they will perform any other duties the librarian assigns as well as making copies for teachers and staff.

Bible
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: English 1
This course provides students a study of different forms of Bible history with special emphasis on the Old Testament and works that allude to Bible sources. Emphasis is placed on the major characters and events.
Technology Engineering Education
One of the main goals of Technology Engineering Education in Tennessee is to advance the technological capabilities for all students and to nurture and promote the professionalism of those engaged in these pursuits.
The Tennessee Career and Technical Education Division seeks to meet the professional needs and interests of all teachers as well as to improve public understanding of technology, innovation, design, and engineering education and its contributions. Technology-Engineering education is an action based program for all students that requires students to use resources to design, produce, use, and assess the impact of products and services that extend human potential to improve and control the natural and human made environment.
Technology Engineering opens the door to discovery and offers a tremendous variety of career options. It's a curriculum that can take you from the depths of the ocean to the far reaches of space, from within the microscopic structures of the human cell to the top of the tallest skyscrapers.
Innovations and Inventions
Grade Level: 9-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 38010 Prerequisite: None
Innovations and Inventions will enable students to further develop technological literacy skills and should be offered as an integral component of the core school curriculum. Integrated academics combined with a hands-on program of study that teaches about the development and applications of technology and the effects technology has on individuals, society and the environment. This course integrates the three (3) Gateway courses throughout the learning expectations and is articulated in all of the sample performance tasks. It is suggested that Innovations and Inventions be implemented at the ninth grade and offered as an integral component of the core school curriculum to all students. This course teaches students how to use, manage, process and assess technology in a contextual learning environment. It is designed as a foundation problem-solving course for students in the ninth grade. This is a one-year course and will give the student the knowledge needed to succeed in Technological Systems.

Technological Systems
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 38110 Prerequisite: Innovations and Inventions
This is an overview course designed to introduce students to the application of technology to solve problems and meet human needs and wants. Laboratory experiences are focused on the technology systems of bio-related technology, communication, computer applications, construction, energy, power, transportation, and manufacturing. Students will study concepts about technological systems and the influences these systems have at home, in communities, and at work. The content of the course includes, but is not limited to, the study of systems of technology, application of technology, design/problem solving, evolving technologies, safety, maintenance, entrepreneurship, leadership, careers, and marketing.

Problems and Solutions in Technology
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 38130 Prerequisite: Two technology courses in an approved coherent sequence and have passed the Gateway English. This course is recommended for Passed Gateway English
Problems and Solutions in Technology is a research course which allows students to develop advanced technical knowledge and skills by solving problems in one or more of the technology systems: communication, computer applications, construction, energy, power, transportation, manufacturing, and bio-related technology. In this research course, students develop and apply the knowledge and skills gained in previous courses to identify and resolve relevant problems.

• This course is designed to give students the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills gained in several courses and apply the skills to new situations. The course integrates mathematics, science, language arts, and social studies competencies in a contextual setting using Project-Based Learning Activities as performance tasks. A culminating research/project report is required to satisfactorily complete this research course.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT
Spanish I
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: Dual and University Paths Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 30210 Prerequisite: None
Spanish I focuses on the students learning greetings, conversation skills, fundamental Spanish grammar, basic conjugation of verbs, sentence structure, and small every day essentials (like numbers, colors, shapes, telling time, etc...). Also, Spanish 1 introduces the students to the Hispanic culture of the United States, Latin America, South America, and Spain. Students will be required to take vocabulary quizzes, unit and mid-unit exams, and complete projects.

Spanish II
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: Dual and University Paths Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 30220 Prerequisite: Spanish I with minimum "C"
Spanish II focuses on learning sentence structure, using Spanish grammar, conversation, conjugation of verbs, and other essential parts of a language. Furthermore, Spanish 2 takes a more in depth look at Hispanic culture of the United States, Latin America, South America, and Spain. Students will be required to take vocabulary quizzes, grammar quizzes, unit and mid-unit exams, and complete projects.

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT

Visual Arts
Grade Level: 9-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 35010 Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to introduce the basic elements of art and principles of design. Students will be exposed to a variety of mediums and methods. Art history and specific artists and periods will also be covered.

Advanced Visual Arts
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 35011 Prerequisite: Grade of (90) or higher in Visual Arts I
This course is for students who have an exceptional ability and interest in art. Students will be exposed to various methods at an advanced level in both two dimensional and three dimensional mediums.
*May be taken up to three times with instructors approval only

BAND
General Information:
The curriculum of the Instrumental program offers students a unique opportunity to discover enjoyment through creative expression that cannot be achieved in other learning areas. Students will continue their musical experience by learning the fundamentals of music and advancing their skills on their instrument. Participation in performance organizations encourages initiative and leadership in the students, stimulates goal-oriented thought process, creates an appreciation and respect for the efforts of others, and assists students to develop a sense of responsibility to them, the organization, and in a broad sense, society.
We recognize that not all high school musicians will make music their career. However, the mental discipline and thought process required in the study of music are applicable in all fields of endeavor.

Concert Band
Grade Level: 9-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Must have participated in concert band prior to their freshman year.
Students must have participated in concert band prior to their freshmen year. Concert band students must have performed in marching band. Concert band members perform in various concerts, community functions, workshops, music festivals, and clinics. Concert band members are encouraged to participate in ETSBOA events such as Clinic Band Auditions and Solo and Ensemble Festival. The concert band will participate in Concert competition.

Marching Band
Grade Level: 9-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 09960 Prerequisite: Must have participated in concert band prior to their freshman year.
Students must have participated in concert band prior to their freshman year. Students in marching band combine instrumental playing, marching, and performance skills. This band performs for athletic events, parades, civic functions, and concerts.
During Marching season, students will meet once a week after-school. Students will be required to attend practices once a week in the month of July and a week of band camp.

Chorus
Grade Level: 9-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 35310 Prerequisite: None.
This course is open to any student who wishes to participate in a choral performance organization. Chorus develops basic music literacy as well as progressing students toward advanced music skills. This course fulfills the requirement for a performing arts credit for college admission and is an elective arts credit.

Music Appreciation (Offered during various years)
Grade Level: 9-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: None.
This course is open to any student who wishes to enroll in a general music class for a Fine Arts credit. Music Appreciation will allow students to experience the music of different time periods and cultures and will make students aware that music is used for other purposes in addition to enjoyment. This course fulfills the requirement for a fine arts credit required for college admission and is an elective arts credit.

Theatre Arts
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 35200 Prerequisite: None.
This course is open to any student who wishes to participate in a drama organization. Theatre Arts allows students to study theatre fundamentals and techniques including: terminology and rehearsal techniques; as well as history and literature specifics to theatre. Participation in all class activities is expected. A required performance occurs late in the semester which incorporates all topics covered in classes and rehearsals. This course fulfills the requirement for a performing arts credit required for college admission and is an elective arts credit.

MATH DEPARTMENT

Minimum math graduation requirements:
University Path: Successful completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and one of the following: Probability and Statistics, Pre-Calculus
Dual Path: Successful completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and one of the following: Probability and Statistics, Pre-Calculus
Technical Path: Successful completion of Technical Math I, Technical Algebra and Technical Geometry. Geometry or Algebra II is required for 9th graders entering during the 2005-06 school years or later.
Algebra I Gateway Test
All students pursuing a University, Dual, or Technical diploma must take and pass the Algebra I Gateway test. Successful completion of this test is, by law, a condition of graduation. Those students who complete Algebra I and do not pass the gateway test are offered remediation before they retake this test. The gateway test is offered at the end of the Algebra course and during the summer.
Mathematics Placement for Incoming 9th Grade Students:
Student in 8th grade math will be recommended for different levels of math based on projected scores that the student has accumulated since the 3rd grade. A student in the 8th grade that has completed Algebra I Honors should enroll in Geometry Honors or Algebra II Honors.

Technical Math
Grade Level: 9 Required Course: Technical path Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31140 Prerequisite: None
Technical Mathematics use problem situations, physical models, and appropriate technology to extend mathematical thinking and engage student reasoning. Problem-solving situations will provide an environment that promotes communication and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines, and to the technological workplace. Students will use physical models in a laboratory setting to represent, explore, and develop abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students apply mathematics in an increasingly technological world. The course includes: problem solving, reasoning, connections, communication, and representation and the relationship of there mathematical processes to applications of the content in the workplace.

Technical Algebra
Grade Level: 9-10 Required Course: Technical Path Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31230 Prerequisite: Technical Math
Technical Algebra uses problem situations, physical models, and appropriate technology to extend mathematical thinking and engage student reasoning. Problem-solving situations, including those related to a variety of careers and technical fields, will provide all students an environment that promotes communication and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines, and to the technological workplace. Students will use physical models in a laboratory setting to represent, explore, and develop abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students apply algebra in an increasingly technological world. The concepts emphasized in the course include: measurement, statistical data analysis, functions, solving equations, and slope as rates of change, and proportionality.
**All students will take the Algebra I Gateway test at the completion of this course.

Algebra I
Grade Level: 9 Elective Courses: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31020 Prerequisite: None
Algebra I is a course that uses problem situations, physical models, and appropriate technology to extend algebraic thinking and engage student reasoning. Problem solving situations will provide all students an environment that promotes communication and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines and to the real world. Students will use physical models to represent, explore, and develop abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students apply mathematics in an increasingly technological world. The concepts emphasized in the course include functions, solving equations, and slope as rates of change, and proportionality.
**All students will take the Algebra I Gateway test at the completion of this course.

Algebra I Honors
Grade Level: 9 Elective Courses: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31021 Prerequisite: Placement
Algebra I Honors is designed for students who excel in mathematics. The same topics will be covered as Algebra I ;however, the material will be covered at a faster pace with more emphasis being placed on topics that extend student learning above and beyond the minimum requirements of Algebra I. Topics emphasized include:
The language of Algebra, real numbers, linear equations, graphs of functions, slope as a rate of change, linear inequalities, systems, polynomials, factoring, quadratic and exponential functions, radical and rational functions, data analysis, and basic probability.
All students who wish to take Honors Mathematics Courses must maintain a minimum "C" average at all times.
**All students will take the Algebra I Gateway test at the completion of this course.

Algebra II
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31030 Prerequisite: Algebra I
Algebra II is a course that uses problem situations, physical models, and appropriate technology to extend algebraic thinking and engage student reasoning. Problem solving situations will provide all students an environment that promotes communication and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines and to the real world. Students will use physical models to represent, explore, and develop abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students apply mathematics in an increasingly technological world. The concepts emphasized in the course include analysis of "family of functions", solving systems of equations, graphing, data analysis, and logarithmic and exponential functions.

Algebra II Honors
Grade Level: 9-10 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31031 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I
Algebra II Honors is designed for students who excel in Algebra. The same topics will be covered as Algebra II; however, the material will be covered at a much faster pace with more emphasis being placed on topics that extend student learning above and beyond the minimum requirements of Algebra II and will focus upon a Pre-Calculus approach. Topics emphasized include: a review of equations, inequalities, relations, functions, systems, and polynomials, as well as, matrices, quadratic functions and inequalities, polynomial functions, conic sections, rational expressions and equations, exponential and logarithmic relations, sequences and series, probability and statistics, trigonometric functions, trigonometric graphs, and trigonometric identities.
*All students who wish to take Honors Mathematics Courses must maintain a minimum "C" average at all times.

Geometry
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31080 Prerequisite: Algebra I
Geometry uses problem situations physical models, and appropriate technology to investigate and justify geometric concepts and relationships. Problem-solving situations provide all students an environment that promotes communication, engages student reasoning, and fosters connections within mathematics, to other disciplines and to the real world. Students will use physical models to represent, explore, and develop abstract concepts. The use of appropriate technology will help students apply mathematics in an increasingly technological world. The concepts and topics emphasized in the course include measurement, geometric patterns, coordinate geometry, two- and three- dimensional figures, transformational geometry, congruence, similarity, inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, and proof.

Geometry Tech
Grade Level: 10-11 Elective Courses: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31082 Prerequisite: Technical Algebra
Technical Geometry incorporates the same core geometric concepts required in a standard geometry course but includes additional topics that focus on career and technical applications. These concepts will be taught using practical applications in a contextual style of teaching, including labs and projects. The structure of the course will include teaching groups of skills and concepts followed by their incorporation in a real world application and setting.

Geometry Honors
Grade Level: 10-11 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31081 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I and Honors Algebra II
Geometry Honors is designed for students who excel in Algebra. The same topics will be covered as Geometry; however, the material will be covered at a much faster pace with more emphasis being placed on topics that extend student learning above and beyond the minimum requirements of Geometry and will focus upon a Pre-Calculus standpoint of topics. Topics emphasized include: lines and angles, reasoning and proof, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, relationships in triangles, proportionality and similarity, right triangles, trigonometry, quadrilaterals, transformations, circles, area, surface area, and volume.
*All students who wish to take Honors Mathematics Courses must maintain a minimum "C" average at all times.

Probability and Statistics
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31360 Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry
Probability and Statistics is designed for students who plan to continue their education at the college level. The course uses meaningful real-world problems and appropriate technologies, calculator and computer, for a more advanced means of statistical analyses, interpretations, and predictions. Topics emphasized include: combinatorics, probability, statistics, and data analysis, as well as, the language of probability.

Pre-Calculus
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31260 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I, Honors
Algebra II, Honors Geometry
Pre-Calculus is designed for students who plan to continue their education at the college level and who excel in the field of mathematics. The course uses meaningful problems and appropriate technologies to build upon previously learned mathematical concepts to develop the underpinnings of Calculus with a huge emphasis on Trigonometry. Topics emphasized include: fundamental algebra concepts, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, inverse functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, and applications of trigonometry.

AP Calculus
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31270 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I, Honors Algebra II, Honors Geometry, and Pre-Calculus
Calculus is designed for students who plan to continue their education at the college level and seek a career in the medical, engineering, or mathematical field. Calculus is an advanced mathematics course focusing on topics related to continuity and discontinuity of functions, differentiation and integration of functions, and complex mathematical applications. The course will allow students to master the following fundamental calculus concepts: limits and continuity, derivatives and applications, the definite integral and applications, differential and mathematical modeling, L'Hộpital's Rule, improper integrals, partial fractions, infinite series, parametric, vector, and polar functions.

Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry
Grade Level: 12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 31240 Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry
Advanced Algebra with Trigonometry is an advanced mathematics course that extends algebraic concepts and applications and that develops trigonometric functions and applications. Through meaningful problems and appropriate technologies, students will study a variety, radical, rational, polynomial, exponential, circular and logarithmic functions.

WELLNESS / PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The Lifetime Wellness Curriculum has been developed to meet the objectives of the Wellness framework approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education. The curriculum offers two semesters allowing each student to earn two (2) Wellness credits. This curriculum meets the state guidelines in that it provides instruction in the seven strands outlined in the framework plus driver education and outdoor education.
The Lifetime Wellness curriculum provides opportunities for students to develop an attitude that reflects a process of positive lifestyle management. Positive lifestyle choices and participation in life-long leisure activities give students the opportunity for a happier, more productive, and higher-quality life.

Wellness I
Grade Level: 9 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 33030 Prerequisite: None
Freshmen are expected to enroll in this course. The following units provide instruction in personal fitness development, sport skills, and classroom activities:
A. Responsibility and Decisions
B. Nutrition/ Fitness
C. Family Life/ Sexuality
D. Substance Use and Abuse
E. Disease Prevention/ Control
F. Safety & First Aid
Note: Students may not enroll in more than one Wellness class per year.

The Physical Education Curriculum has been developed to meet the objectives of the Physical Education framework as developed by the Tennessee State Board of Education. Physical Education classes are offered each semester. Each class earns one (1) credit toward graduation.
The Physical Education curriculum encourages students to maintain an active lifestyle for the health benefits and social engagement. Positive attitudes toward being healthy and active will give students the opportunity to live a long and productive life.

P.E. I
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 33010 Prerequisite: Wellness
Freshmen must seek approval from the teachers, principals, and guidance counselors.
P.E. I involve team sports and fitness activities to increase skills and aerobic fitness. Below are some examples of class activities:

Ultimate Frisbee Volleyball Whiffleball
Tae Bo Calisthenics Touch/ Flag Football


P.E. II
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 33010 Prerequisite: P.E. 1
P.E. II is an advanced class with higher standards for students. Skill levels and participation must exceed student performance during P.E. 1. This class is for students with high levels of competition that wish to refine and improve skills and body fitness.
Below are some activities:
A. Volleyball B. Calisthenics
1. Skill development 1. Aerobic
2. Skill tests 2. Anaerobic
3. Competition 3. Weight lifting

C. Whiffleball D. Football / Ultimate Frisbee
1. Skill development 1. Skill development
2. Skill tests 2. Skill tests
3. Competition 3. Competition

Fitness
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 33021
Prerequisite: Principal, Teacher, and Guidance Counselor approval
Fitness is a class to improve the physical performance of the body through stretching, calisthenics and a weight program. Below are some examples of activities:
A. leg stretches B. back stretches C. sprints/ laps
C. squats D. bench press E. clean and jerk

Men / Women's Conditioning
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Number: Womens-33023 Mens-33024 Prerequisites: Approval by teachers, principal, and guidance counselor
Fitness is a class that strives to help each student improve aerobic and anaerobic fitness by improving body composition, flexibility, muscle strength and endurance. Below are some activities:

A. Daily Beginners
1. Pushups
2. Jumping Jacks
3. Thigh burners
4. Step-ups
5. Jump Ropes
B. Running
1. Cross Country Course
2. Sprints
3. Stops and starts
4. Suicides
5. Mile Run


R.O.T.C I, II, III, IV
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1 each course
Block Course Number: Projected Times: R.O.T.C. I & IV- second semester R.O.T.C. II & III - first semester
The AFJROTC program is a 4-year program for high school students. Each year is divided into two categories: academics and leadership. Academic studies include history, science, space, and optional studies. Leadership studies include Air Force customs and courtesies, cadet corps activities, study habits, time management, communication skills, and leadership and management studies.

Driver's Education
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 33210 Prerequisite: Must be 15 years of age and passing required classes Class Size: 18 students
Driver's Education consists of 30 hours of classroom instruction, 11 hours of in car observation and 6 hours of behind the wheel experience. Students are given a wide variety of different road experiences, including city, country, and interstate driving. Knowledge test for learner's permits and driving tests are administered to students who meet the age requirements.

Science Department

The Science department curriculum stresses the processes of science so that students can discover and interpret scientific knowledge, develop positive attitudes and interests related to science, and recognize that these behaviors can be applied in making decisions in an age influenced by science and technology. Students enroll in one of the following courses of study, some courses based on teacher recommendation and GPA: Physical Science, Environmental Science, Biology, Honors Biology, Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology, and Physics. Students are required to earn 3 science credits for graduation. Students must also meet the state standard on the Biology Gateway Test in order to receive a high school diploma.
All students must earn three science credits in order to meet current graduation requirements.
As students fulfill these three credits, they must earn at least one credit in the Life Science category and one credit from the Physical Science category. See the following table for a list of courses that qualify in each area.

Life Sciences Physical Sciences
Environmental Science Physical Sciences
Biology Chemistry
Anatomy and Physiology Physics

Biology Gateway Test
All students pursuing a University, Dual, or Technical diploma must take and pass the Biology gateway test. This includes those students taking Biology and Biology Honors. Successful completion of this test is, by law, a condition of graduation. Those students who take Biology and do not pass the gateway test are offered remediation before they retake this test. The gateway test is offered at the end of each semester and during the summer.

(Science Recommended Course Sequences)
Class Technical Path University or Dual Path
Freshman Environmental Science Physical Science
Sophomore Biology Biology or Biology Honors
Junior Physical Science Anatomy & Physiology or Chemistry
Senior Chemistry or Physics

Environmental Science
Grade Level: 9-10 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 32600 Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to increase the knowledge and skills in all areas of science through real world application. Students investigate fundamental ecological principals, earth's natural resources, energy sources and their use, population dynamics, and human interactions with the environment. The concepts studied relate to future classes in both life and physical science.

Physical Science
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 32021 for freshman, 32020 for others Prerequisite: None
Physical Science explores the relationship between matter and energy. Students investigate forces and motion, the chemical and physical properties of matter, the ways in which matter and energy interact within the natural world and the forms and properties of energy. Physical Science provides a basic foundation for advanced studies in chemistry and physics.

Biology
Grade Level: 10 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 32100 Prerequisite: Environmental or Physical Science
Biology is a course which continues the development of the requisite skills to enable the student to pass the Gateway Test. The six standards stressed in the class are as follows: Cells, Interactions, Photosynthesis and Respiration, Genetics and Biotechnology, Evolution, and Diversity. Students must complete a state end-of-the course test, the Biology Gateway Test, worth 15% of their final grade. Students are required to meet the state standard on the Gateway Test in order to receive a high school diploma.

Biology Honors
Grade Level: 10-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 32101 Prerequisite: Physical Science previously completed with a minimum "B" average.
Honors Biology also covers the six standards necessary for students to successfully complete the Biology Gateway Test: Cells, Interactions, Photosynthesis and Respiration, Genetics and Biotechnology, Evolution, and Diversity. This class is more challenging and requires more intensive study than Biology. All students must meet the state standard on the Biology Gateway Test in order to receive a high school diploma.

Anatomy and Physiology
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 32510 Prerequisite: Biology previously completed with a minimum "B" average; not a replacement for Chemistry (students should have completed or be currently enrolled in Chemistry).
This course meets the standards as set forth by the state of Tennessee. It will include language of anatomy, a brief study of histology, and a study of the organ systems of a human body. Students will use models, slides, one another, as well as dissection of such things as a brain, eye, heart, and kidney (not a person's but one belonging to an animal like a pig, sheep, or cow) to study material. The course is taught in a lecture/ discussion format with labs at least once or twice a week.

Chemistry I
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 32210 Prerequisite: Currently enrolled in Geometry or Algebra.
Chemistry deals with the composition, structure and properties of all kinds of matter, and of the changes which take place during interaction. The course includes the following subjects: matter and energy; atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical calculations, acids, bases, and salts. The ability to read and understand written problems is essential. Laboratory investigations are a part of this course.

Physics
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: YES Credit: 1
Block Course Numbers: 32310 Prerequisite: Algebra.
This course gives students an understanding of the physical laws of nature that govern our universe. The goal is to understand how energy is transformed from one form to another to serve man's purpose. Some areas of study are mechanics, vectors, rotational motion, electricity, and modern physics. Physics is a mathematical course, and use of mathematics is widespread. This course is designed to provide the students who are still developing their mathematical skills with a challenging, but manageable, context to learn these concepts. Students are expected to study.

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

World Geography
Grade Level: 9-10 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 34100 Prerequisite: None.
In World Geography, high school students study people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international levels from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. The six social studies standards of essential content knowledge and four process skills are integrated for instructional purposes. The standards are as follows: Culture, Economics, Geography, Governance and Civics, History, Individuals, Groups, & Interactions.

American Government and Economics
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 34070 Prerequisite: Geography
Government and Economics is the study of local, state, and federal government. The class looks at the economics of our country in relation to other countries. The class also studies the court system and how it can benefit us as a person and nation.
Important Notes regarding American Government and Economics:
Due to the nature of block scheduling, one-half credit courses such as Economics and American Government are typically taught for one-half of one semester (45 school days). These two 45-day block courses are typically scheduled one after another in order to create a full semester block class.

United States History
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 34050 Prerequisite: None
Emphasis is placed on the chronological development of the United States stressing the uniqueness of our form of government, its Constitution, and the flexibility for which this constitution provides. It includes social, economic and cultural development, as well as a study of government, politics, and foreign affairs.

Advanced Placement United States History
Grade Level: 11-12 Required Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 34400 Prerequisite: Student should have a minimum 3.4 overall GPA, and have a minimum "B" average in English.
This course is open to students who wish to approach United States History at an advanced level. Students are expected to possess a strong social studies and/or history background, and must evidence a capacity for achievement. The course is taught as a first year college survey through the use of a college textbook and college level parallel reading. Emphasis is placed upon historical analysis, writing, research, and documentary study. Students who have had United States History or Advanced United States History may also take AP United States History and earn two United States History credits. This course meets the United States History graduation requirement for those students who have no previous United States History credits. Students take the AP United States History Exam in May.

Psychology
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: No Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 34330 Prerequisite: Minimum "C" average in English Psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. Topics covered are history, methods of research, major schools of thought, theories of learning, memory and forgetting, thinking and reasoning, biological influences on behavior, sensation and perception, sleep and dreams, human development, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, intelligence, psychological testing, stress and conflict, behavior disorders and ways of treating them, and social factors which influence human behavior. Psychology, because of its broad applications to many professions, scientific specialties, and daily living, can help one develop important thinking and reasoning skills. Resource personnel are utilized when available.
AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGY
Fundamentals of Agriculture
Grade Level: 9-10 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 51540 Prerequisite: None
Fundamentals of Agriculture is designed to develop the basic theories and principles involved in animal science, agribusiness, agricultural mechanics, and natural resource management. The standards prepare students to choose among agricultural careers for the 21st century.

Advanced Principles of Agriculture
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 51550 Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Agriculture
Advanced Principles of Agriculture includes standards that challenge students to plan for one of the five career clusters in agriculture. Understanding the skills necessary to be successful in an agriculture career is important for students as they enter the agricultural industry in the 21st century. This course is designed to extend and expand the basic skills developed through Fundamentals of Agriculture in agriculture production, leadership knowledge and advanced phases of agriculture education.

Exterior Landscaping
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1 (2 credits max)
Block Course Number: 51630 Prerequisite: Any other Agriculture class
This course is designed to introduce students to the mechanics of landscaping. They will learn basic skills in drafting, identifying and selecting plant material, setting up a small business and other practical skills needed in the field of landscaping. In addition, the student will develop leadership skills necessary for directing employees and working with consumers.

Greenhouse Management
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1 (2 credits max)
Block Course Number: 51670 Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Agriculture
This course is designed to develop basic skills and general knowledge of greenhouse operations. It includes standards regarding environmental needs of plants, government regulations of greenhouses and management skills needed for successful greenhouse products.

Wildlife Management
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: None
This course emphasizes the awareness of conservation and preservation management practices utilized to ensure the sustainability of our outdoor resources. Integrated academics and experiential learning will build conservation awareness among students. This will in turn generate career interests and more responsible land ownership in the community as we enter the 21st century.

Agriculture Engineering
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1 (2 credits max)
Block Course Number: 51520 Prerequisite: Advanced Principles in Agriculture
Principles of Agricultural Engineering include standards on metal fabrication and agriculture structures. Subject matter will include hot/cold metal work, cost and material computation, electric wiring and codes, engine service and repair, blueprint reading and drawing and selection of appropriate materials for projects.

Livestock Management
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 51770 Prerequisite: Advanced Principles in Agriculture
Livestock Management will help prepare students for further courses of study in animal science. The effective management of livestock requires an applicable knowledge of animal anatomy, nutrition, health genetics, facilities and the effects of livestock production on the environment. This course further prepares students to apply these principles.

Agriculture Mechanics
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1 (2 credits max)
Block Course Number: 51510 Prerequisite: Advanced Principles in Agriculture
Agricultural Mechanics includes standards to prepare students for operational procedures for a shop or a home environment. Students learn basic skills in areas ranging from welding and electricity to land measuring to plumbing. As students enter the 21st century, they need to have skills that can be used in a rural or an urban environment.


SPECIAL NEEDS DEPARTMENT

Students enrolled in the Special Needs program must qualify for acceptance based upon prescribed state criteria and are only admitted as a result of an I.E.P. Team decision.

Basic Math
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 94563 Prerequisite: Admittance to class is by decision of the I.E.P. Team.
Basic Math is designed to meet the individual math needs of the student with special needs. This course focuses on the prerequisite skills a student needs in order to be successful in the general math curriculum. An emphasis is placed on Pre-Algebra and Algebra skills to prepare students for the Gateway Algebra exam.

Basic English
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 94560 Prerequisite: Admittance to class is by decision of the I.E.P. Team.
Basic English is designed to meet the individual Language Arts needs of the student with special needs. This course focuses on those prerequisite skills a student needs in order to be successful in the general English curriculum. An emphasis is placed on the Gateway objectives and preparation for the English II Gateway Exam and the English 11 Writing Assessment.

Basic Social Studies
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: Admittance to class is by decision of the I.E.P. Team.
Basic Social Studies is designed to meet the individual social studies needs of the students with special needs. The course focuses on American Government, Economics, World Geography, and United States History.

Basic Biology
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: Admittance to class is by decision of the I.E.P. Team.
Basic Science is designed to meet the individual science needs of the student with special needs. This course focuses on the prerequisite skills needed for students to be prepared to move into the general science curriculum. This course also focuses on preparation for the Biology Gateway Exam. Selected students have the option to take the Biology Gateway exam while taking the Basic Science class.

Basic Geography
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: Admittance to class is by decision of the I.E.P. Team.
Basic Geography is designed to meet the individual needs of the students with special needs. The course focuses on U.S. Geography.

CDC
Grade Level: 9-12 Elective Course: NO Credit: 1
Block Course: Prerequisite: Admittance to class is by decision of the I.E.P. Team.
This program is formulated to meet the needs of a qualifying group of Special Needs students who are socially and academically below grade level. Areas of study include: English, mathematics, independent living skills, and vocational skills. In the area of mathematics, students acquire the basic and practical math skills necessary for functioning in our world today. Students advance according to their individual abilities.
Emphasis is placed on basic computational skills and the application of those skills in every day life. In the area of English, students acquire the basic survival skills needed in reading, writing, spelling, and functional vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on the application of these skills in every day life. In the area of independent living skills, students learn housekeeping skills such as cooking, cleaning, clothing care, and daily living skills such as grooming, shopping, appropriate social skills, leisure activities and community, city, state, and country awareness. In the area of vocational skills, students acquire basic skills needed to obtain and hold employment. Students move from in-class vocational training to school-site jobs. Course numbers are based on period of class:

MARKETING

Principles of Business
Grade Level: 9th-10th Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 37090 Prerequisite: None
This course introduces students to the basic aspects of business: Supply and Demand, International Economy, Business Structure, Finances, Management, Information Systems, etc. Students will analyze the elements of the business environment and problem solving skills for success.

Marketing I
Grade Level: 11th -12th Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 50000 Prerequisite: none
This course introduces the field of Marketing. The Marketing I focus is of Manufacturing, Distribution, Sales, and Promotion of Goods and Services. Business Operations, communication, and human resources are studied to extend the student's knowledge of the business environment. Marketing students are also eligible for the Co-op program of on-the-job training.

Marketing II
Grade Level: 12th Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 50010 Prerequisite: none
Although there is no prerequisite course for Marketing II, Marketing I is suggested. Marketing II increases the study of Sales, Promotion, Human Resources, and Communication. Marketing II also prepares the student for the work force through interviewing concepts, applications, and resumes.
Marketing students are also eligible for the Co-Op program of on-the-job training.

Marketing Co-Op
Grade Level: 11th -12th Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: Prerequisite: Marketing I or II
Projected Times: 4th period each semester
Co-op students can gain valuable real life experience through on-the-job training. Only those students presently enrolled in a Marketing class are eligible for this opportunity

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

Family and Consumer Sciences
Grade Level: 9-10 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 56030 Prerequisite: None
Family and Consumer Sciences is a comprehensive, foundation course designed to assist students in developing the core knowledge and skills needed to manage their lives. The course allows students to select specific areas for future concentrated study. The integration of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) provides students with opportunities for leadership development, personal growth, and school/community involvement.

Nutrition and Foods
Grade Level: 10-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 56090 Prerequisite: Family and Consumer Science (preferred)
Nutrition and Foods is a specialized Junior/Senior level course with emphasis on helping students understand the significance of food, principles of nutrition, and the relationship of nutrition to health and well-being.

Life Connections
Grade Level: 11-12 Elective Course: Yes Credit: 1
Block Course Number: 56230 Prerequisite: Family and Consumer Science or Nutrition and Foods
Life Connections is the capstone of the Family and Consumer Science classes. It emphasized the development of skills related to decision making, problem solving, critical and creative thinking, technology, and workplace readiness. The role of communication is emphasized.

Center for Technology
Maximum number of terms a course is offered

Automotive Repair: 4 terms (5th Work-based Learning with teacher approval)

Carpentry: 3 terms (4th term Work-based Learning with teacher approval)

Collision Repair: 3 terms (4th term Work-based Learning with teacher approval)

Computer Aided Drafting: 4 terms

Cosmetology: 6 terms

Criminal Justice: 3 terms (4th Work-based Learning with teacher approval)

Early Childhood Education Careers: 3 terms (4th term Work-based Learning with teacher approval)

Health Science Technology: 3 terms (4th term Work-based Learning with teacher approval)

Machine Tool: 4 terms

PC Repair: 4 terms

Welding: 4 terms